dongzhuo1733
dongzhuo1733
2018-08-30 08:10
浏览 72
已采纳

为归档功能fs创建单元测试

I have the following function which is working as expected. Now I want to create unit test for it. The problem is that I'm using the file system and I am not able to figure out how to do it with some mocks or any other solution. Any idea how this can be done simply in Go? Should I really create a files and check then with unit test? I'm afraid that in some system it will work and some it breaks (winodos/ mac/linux)

This is the working function:

func Zipper(src string,artifact string,target string) error {

    zf, err := os.Create(artifact)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }
    defer zf.Close()

    ziper := zip.NewWriter(zf)
    defer ziper.Close()

    fileInfo, err := os.Stat(src)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }

    var bs string
    if fileInfo.IsDir(); len(target) > 0 {
        bs = target
    } else {
        bs = filepath.Base(src)
    }

    if bs != "" {
        bs += "/"
    }

    filepath.Walk(src, func(path string, info os.FileInfo, err error) error {
        if err != nil {
            return err
        }

        if info.IsDir() {
            return nil
        }

        header, err := zip.FileInfoHeader(info)
        if err != nil {
            return err
        }

        if bs != "" {
            header.Name = filepath.Join(strings.TrimPrefix(path, bs))
        }

        header.Method = zip.Deflate

        writer, err := ziper.CreateHeader(header)
        if err != nil {
            return err
        }

        file, err := os.Open(path)
        if err != nil {
            return err
        }
        defer file.Close()
        _, err = io.Copy(writer, file)
        return err
    })

    return err
}

I read the following but it not much helping in my case How to mock/abstract filesystem in go?

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3条回答 默认 最新

  • dongli8979
    dongli8979 2018-08-30 08:21
    已采纳

    The simplest way to test a function that depends on the filesystem, is to add some set-up and tear-down around each test, which puts the necessary files in place before running the test, then removes them after running the test.

    func TestZipper(t *testing.T) {
        // Create temporary files
        defer func() {
            // Clean up temporary files
        }()
        t.Run("group", func(t *testing.T) { // This is necessary so the above defer function doesn't run too soon
            // your actual tests
        })
    }
    
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  • dqm4977
    dqm4977 2018-08-30 08:27

    I know that "doesn't access the file system" is part of the definition of "unit test" to a lot of people. If your profession is not in finding and defending definitions: Forget that restriction. Filesystem access is fast and fine and the go tooling even treats folders named "testdata" special: Such folders are supposed to contain test data to be used during tests.

    Go (and their users) aren't very pedantic in distinguishing "unit" from "integration" tests. Take a look at the stdlib of how to test such stuff. It is more important to write relevant tests than getting childish on fs access. (Note that a file system and a database are technically external systems, but in real life you cannot compile Go code without a file system, so isolating the test from this "external system" is ridiculous.)

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  • dongyue4964
    dongyue4964 2018-08-30 08:32

    Well, you might look for a way to manipulate filesystem in a safe way or look for a solution somewhere else. What is the responsibility of this function? Shall it prepare a zip file or write it to filesystem?

    I suggest that you should take out file creation out of this function and change the function to:

    func Zipper(src string, dst io.Writer, target string) error {
        ziper := zip.NewWriter(dst)
        defer ziper.Close()
    

    This way, for a test purpose you can provide a simple buffer, while in production use your beloved filesystem!

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